Upcoming Exhibitions

  • M.C. Escher: Reality and Illusion

    Sept. 20, 2014 — Jan. 5, 2015

     

    M.C. Escher created intricate geometric drawings and prints of spaces that can only exist on paper and in the viewer’s mind. His images continue to boggle the eye and the brain, captivating viewers more than 40 years after his death. In Escher’s world, stairways are built upside-down, water runs uphill and every object is reproduced with mathematical precision. This Escher retrospective is one of the largest and most comprehensive ever offered in the United States. Its exclusive New England showing at the Currier Museum of Art will contain his best-known works of art, early family portraits, original preparatory sketches and mezzotints he created, and one of the of lithographic stones he used to print a later work.

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    Image left: M.C. Escher, Waterfall, © 2014 The M.C. Escher Company-The Netherlands. All rights reserved. www.mcescher.com
    Image right: M.C. Escher, Drawing Hands, © 2014 The M.C. Escher Company-The Netherlands. All rights reserved. www.mcescher.com

    Exhibition Pricing

    In addition to the regular Museum admission fee, admission to the special exhibition is $5 per adult (18 and older) and per youth (age 13-17). Admission for children 12 and younger is free. Currier Members and their youth family Members receive limited complimentary admission based upon membership level. Children 12 and younger are admitted free. For further details, visit http://www.currier.org/support/member-benefits/mc-escher-member-benefits or call 603.669.6144, x152.

    Exhibition Support

    The Currier’s presentation of the exhibition and related educational programs are sponsored by TD Charitable Foundation and TD Bank; Dyn; The Badger Fund and the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation; and by individual support from Dwight and Susi Churchill and Barbara and Thomas Putnam.

    Escher-inspired programs are supported by the Nashua Arts & Sciences Fund and the Ruth and James Ewing Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation and the Netherland-America Foundation.

    The exhibition is from the collection of the Herakleidon Museum, Athens, Greece, www.herakleidon-art.gr.

    Exhibition press release

  • Still Life: 1970s Photorealism

    Jan. 24, 2015 — May 3, 2015

    Imagine paintings that look so real that you feel you can walk into the canvas and back in time, or sculptures so lifelike that you want to reach out and interact with the subjects. In the 1970s, a group of primarily American artists including Chuck Close and Duane Hanson decided that art should accurately reflect the world we see around us. Consciously rejecting the prevailing artistic styles of abstraction, Minimalism and the Pop Art of Andy Warhol and others, Photorealists took photographs of commonplace scenes and precisely recreated those worlds in large paintings and sculptures. The artworks that will be on view in this exhibition reflect that passion for hyperrealism and provide today’s audiences with a nostalgic and unflinching journey back in time to life 40 years ago. If you lived through the 1960s and 1970s, these images of diners, muscle cars and street scenes will seem intensely familiar.

  • Audubon's Wild Animals of North America

    May 23, 2015 — Aug. 30, 2015

    During the Industrial Revolution, as the United States grew westward, there was great public fascination with America’s unique and varied wildlife. John James Audubon shared that enthusiasm and sought to take advantage of it by portraying these animals in drawings and etchings, which he included in limited edition books. While best known for his precise studies of birds, this exhibition will feature his interest in mammals, most of which were drawn to appear in their natural settings. Easing Audubon’s struggle to accurately recreate these creatures, the animals were often made available to him stuffed and mounted in displays. Audubon’s artworks became immensely popular in England and across the U.S., and remain some of the finest studies of American wildlife in existence. This exhibition is the result of a collaboration between the Currier and New Hampshire Audubon, which is celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2014. NH Audubon is making their limited edition (1845-1848) Audubon portfolio available for display for the first time in the state.

  • James Nachtwey: The 9/11 Portfolio

    Sept. 11, 2015 — Jan. 3, 2016

    On September 11, 2001, award-winning photojournalist James Nachtwey stood with his camera a short distance from the crumbling Twin Towers in New York City. His photographs are among the most iconic and tragically beautiful visual accounts we have of that grim day. This powerful exhibition will include photographs Nachtwey took on 9/11. It also includes pictures taken in Afghanistan before 9/11 and in Iraq afterward, suggesting a context for what precipitated the deadliest attack on America’s soil and the events to follow. It concludes with highly personal images of American soldiers, their families and others affected by these events. The photographs on view are new acquisitions to the Currier collection.

  • Killer Heels: The Art of the High Heeled Shoe

    Feb. 6, 2016 — May 15, 2016

     

    Carrie Bradshaw and the women from Sex in the City didn’t invent the high-heeled shoe, but they really helped us embrace it. A fashionista’s dream, Killer Heels will present a 400-year history of fabulous footwear, revealing high heels as both stunning architectural creations and works of art in their own right. About 100 contemporary and 50 historical high heels will be on view, including shoes by noted designers Prada, Alexander McQueen, Jean Paul Gaultier, Miu Miu, Christian Louboutin, Ferragamo, Manolo Blahnik and more. Drawn from the collections of the Brooklyn Museum and the Bata Show Museum in Toronto, the exhibition includes six films created specifically for the show by noted artists, each exploring the cultural, social and aesthetic qualities that make us love the high heel.

    Image left: Christian Louboutin. “Printz,” Spring/Summer 2013. Courtesy of Christian Louboutin. Photo: Jay Zukerkorn
    Image right: Nicholas Kirkwood. Pumps, Spring/Summer 2013. Suede with gold and clear Swarovski crystals. Courtesy of Nicholas Kirkwood. Photo: Jay Zukerkorn

    Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe is organized by Lisa Small, Curator of Exhibitions, Brooklyn Museum.